The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby bandit » Tue Jan 10, 2012 4:05 pm

Why the heck do publishers charge as much for an ebook as a paperback... Argh!

Short Answer: because they can

Long Answer: because publishers are fighting against the future tooth and nail, just like the music industry and film industry before it...
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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby Saunders » Tue Jan 10, 2012 4:36 pm

bandit wrote:Why the heck do publishers charge as much for an ebook as a paperback... Argh!

Short Answer: because they can

Long Answer: because publishers are fighting against the future tooth and nail, just like the music industry and film industry before it...


Actually, it's apparently competing pricing models in the marketplace. Here's a good description: http://t.co/3rqwezd
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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby Zuran_Alda » Tue Jan 10, 2012 4:52 pm

Saunders wrote:
bandit wrote:Why the heck do publishers charge as much for an ebook as a paperback... Argh!

Short Answer: because they can

Long Answer: because publishers are fighting against the future tooth and nail, just like the music industry and film industry before it...


Actually, it's apparently competing pricing models in the marketplace. Here's a good description: http://t.co/3rqwezd



Urghh ... economics hurts my brain.
Dungeon Bastard wrote:High-level characters run roughshod over the unwashed masses all the time. And that is by design. It's not just Darwinian. It's Gygaxian!
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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby bandit » Tue Jan 10, 2012 5:07 pm

They are still thinking in terms of supply and demand.
It won't work when the model for electronic content is how much is it worth to me. Music industry found that out the hard way. How many cd stores do you see now?
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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby bandit » Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:52 pm

This may be old news to some here, but the halifax public library has ebook lending, you can go to the website and download a book. I think the DRM has an expiry, but no big deal if you can read the book in a timely manner. I think I may have just found my preferred solution. Congrats publishers, now you will see no coin.
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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby orcdoubleax » Wed Jan 11, 2012 12:57 pm

Interesting
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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby bandit » Wed Jan 11, 2012 1:27 pm

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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby Zuran_Alda » Fri May 11, 2012 10:24 am

Some updates from my recent reading list.

Powderburns: Cocaine, Contras and the Drug Wars by Celerino Castillo III - a chilling page-turning autobiographical expose of the author's time in the DEA and his investigations that exposed the high-level government links to the arms trade, the drug war in South America and the Middle East ... an investigation that was eventually quashed and swept under the rug as it played out on the television in the widely viewed inquiry into the Iran-Contra affair. The boom is one of those hard to put down ones as there is a personal note in the writing ... we can feel the authors exuberant patriotism and desire to do good in the beginning that slowly drives him into disillusionment with the institutions he vowed to protect.

The Gladiators by Fik Meijer - a decent examination of the life of the Roman gladiator that touches on the origins of the sport as well as what it meant to the Roman world and the gladiators. It does a great job of examining the gladiator as seen in pop culture and shows what is both wrong and right about their depictions. A short but excellent read.

Mysteries of Britain by Lewis Spence - an insightful look at the origins of Druidism written in the early 20th century as the Celtic Revival was picking up steam. It is a little dry in that uses a lot of heady language and historical facts to challenge the then widely accepted views that the Druidic religion originated in the East. He presents a combination of historical fact and ancient British literature and folklore to argue that Druidism has more in common with the proto-western funerary and worship rites of the tribes that inhabited North Africa several thousand years ago who had eventually migrated and populated large portions of Western Europe and Britain. A little dated but still worth a read.

Hellbound Hearts - a collection of short stories inspired by the first three Hellraiser films and the short story that they were based upon ("The Hellbound Heart" by Clive Barker). Some hits and misses. Only two stories really stood out to me but a decent read nonetheless.

Caesar's Legion by Stephen Dando-Collins - an excellent and wonderful read. This is a very informative overview and account of the history of the Tenth Legion which was raised by Julius Caesar for his campaign in Gaul and became the iconic elite legion of the Roman Empire. Not only does it provide exciting accounts of the battles and campaigns it took part in, the book also gives great insight into the organization of the legion, how they operated, how they were commanded, what it meant to be a legionnaire, etc. A must read for anyone interested in Roman military history.

The Cold Spot by Tom Piccirilli - Ed Brubaker's collaborations with Sean Philips always have little editorials and essays in the end about their inspirations and recommendations for their heavily noir themed projects. In one of them he highly recommends Piccirilli so I gave this book a shot. I am glad I did. It is a taut, brutal crime thriller that builds tension expertly and then explodes like a sharp jab to the ribs. Violent and gritty, it also possesses characters that have deep feelings and passions. Immediately after finishing it I placed an order for several of his other novels on Amazon.

Next up: The Day of the Barbarians: The Battle that Led to the Fall of the Roman Empire by Allessandro Barbero.
Dungeon Bastard wrote:High-level characters run roughshod over the unwashed masses all the time. And that is by design. It's not just Darwinian. It's Gygaxian!
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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby caperbear » Fri May 11, 2012 11:36 pm

Is anyone here a fan of Steven Brust and his Dragaerean novels? whereas a lot of fantasy authors try to titilate with sex and infanticide he's found a different method: talking about food :) i swear every time his principle character Vlad Taltos starts talking about the food he's making or eating i get hungry. (his family was in the restaurant business before he became an assasin for the 'elven' maffia.)
Ohhhhhh! So suddenly Miss Goody Four Shoes over here doesn't kill anymore. She killed me not five minutes ago! What am I, chopped liver?
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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby bluenail » Thu Nov 08, 2012 1:09 am

Phew - I just got back from the World Fantasy Convention in Toronto, and there are some GREAT books coming to the bookstores...but I thought that I would mention one that might be of particular interest to this crowd.

Pathfinder's Tales: Death's Heretic by James L Sutter.
He did a great reading, and I was lucky enough to get a copy in the swag bag. Am part way through and it's very entertaining so far. Two thumbs up!
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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby Ash » Thu Jan 09, 2014 12:48 pm

Any recent fantasy/sci-fi reads you would recommend? I've been mostly re-reading books recently and would like to find some thing new.

Thanks
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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby bandit » Thu Jan 09, 2014 12:54 pm

I forget if you like the gritty GRRM style of fantasy, but if you do check out Joe Abercrombie's series.

Here is the first book:
http://www.amazon.com/The-Blade-Itself-First-Law/dp/159102594X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1389282693&sr=8-1&keywords=the+blade+itself
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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby Zuran_Alda » Thu Jan 09, 2014 2:43 pm

I got this series for Christmas and am looking forward to it.

I previously read Best Served Cold by him and enjoyed it thoroughly. Monza Murcatto is bad ass.

Ash,

I have been reading A Dream of Eagles and, while it is not fantasy, it is a fantastic read. It is Jack Whyte's historical fiction take on the Arthurian tradition. Highly recommended.
Dungeon Bastard wrote:High-level characters run roughshod over the unwashed masses all the time. And that is by design. It's not just Darwinian. It's Gygaxian!
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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby Ash » Thu Jan 09, 2014 5:51 pm

Thanks, I will check out both suggestions. I admit I struggled brought the GRM series towards the end, and haven't even attempted the last one. One of the few series where I prefer the tv adaptation!
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Re: The Book Nook Thread (Literary Discussion)

Postby Tem » Wed Mar 26, 2014 5:31 pm

bandit wrote:I forget if you like the gritty GRRM style of fantasy, but if you do check out Joe Abercrombie's series.

Here is the first book:
http://www.amazon.com/The-Blade-Itself-First-Law/dp/159102594X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1389282693&sr=8-1&keywords=the+blade+itself


I had a Chapters card burning a hole in my pocket, so I ordered all three books. Having just finished Tigana, they will be next up to bat.

I found Tigana better than Last Light of the Sun (both by Guy Gavriel Kay) which had originally turned me off him as an author. At this point, I may consider another of his books at some point in the future. Suggestions?

I've also been meaning to post my opinions of the latest Locke Lamora books (Republic of Thieves by Scott Lynch). Compared to the first two books, this one was a big let down. He spent darn near half the book filling in details of the past and discussing Lamora's tortured relationship with Sabetha. The plot in the present is terribly contrived but none the less provides some darkly humourous moments. It concludes with a huge reveal about Locke that is completely out of the blue and seems to indicate the direction future books may take. I'll probably pick up the next book in the series, but for what its worth, the upcoming prequel novellas may bear more fruit.

At the moment, the book I'm most waiting for (besides The Winds of Winter, of course) is "The Doors of Stone" - the last book in the Kvothe trilogy by Patrick Rothfuss. But, I've got lots to plough through before then.
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