Rules Review

Wineandcheese's 5e Campaign

Rules Review

Postby wineandcheese » Thu Apr 30, 2015 9:03 am

Last edited by wineandcheese on Fri Jun 10, 2016 11:20 am, edited 11 times in total.
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Re: Rules Review

Postby wineandcheese » Thu Apr 30, 2015 9:03 am


Being Prone


Combatants often find themselves lying on the ground, either because they are knocked down or because they throw themselves down. In the game, they are prone, a condition described in appendix A.

You can drop prone without using any of your speed. Standing up takes more effort; doing so costs an amount of movement equal to half your speed. For example, if your speed is 30 feet, you must spend 15 feet of movement to stand up. You can’t stand up if you don’t have enough movement left or if your speed is 0.

To move while prone, you must crawl or use magic such as teleportation. Every foot of movement while crawling costs 1 extra foot. Crawling 1 foot in difficult terrain, therefore, costs 3 feet of movement.
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Re: Rules Review

Postby wineandcheese » Thu Apr 30, 2015 9:08 am

Grappling

When you want to grab a creature or wrestle with it, you can use the Attack action to make a special melee attack, a grapple. If you’re able to make multiple attacks with the Attack action, this attack replaces one of them.

The target of your grapple must be no more than one size larger than you, and it must be within your reach. Using at least one free hand, you try to seize the target by making a grapple check, a Strength (Athletics) check contested by the target’s Strength (Athletics) or Dexterity (Acrobatics) check (the target chooses the ability to use).

If you succeed, you subject the target to the grappled condition (see appendix A). The condition specifies the things that end it, and you can release the target whenever you like (no action required).

-Escaping a Grapple.
A grappled creature can use its action to escape. To do so, it must succeed on a Strength (Athletics) or Dexterity (Acrobatics) check contested by your Strength (Athletics) check.

-Moving a Grappled Creature.
When you move, you can drag or carry the grappled creature with you, but your speed is halved, unless the creature is two or more sizes smaller than you.
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Re: Rules Review

Postby wineandcheese » Thu May 07, 2015 11:52 pm

Opportunity Attacks

In a fight, everyone is constantly watching for enemies to drop their guard. You can rarely move heedlessly past your foes without putting yourself in danger; doing so provokes an opportunity attack.

You can make an opportunity attack when a hostile creature that you can see moves out of your reach. To make the opportunity attack, you use your reaction

to make one melee attack against the provoking creature. The attack interrupts the provoking creature’s movement, occurring right before the creature leaves your reach.

You can avoid provoking an opportunity attack by taking the Disengage action. You also don’t provoke an opportunity attack when you teleport or when someone or something moves you without using your movement, action, or reaction. For example, you don’t provoke an opportunity attack if an explosion hurls you out of a foe’s reach or if gravity causes you to fall past an enemy.
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Re: Rules Review

Postby wineandcheese » Tue May 19, 2015 2:46 pm

Hit Dice

Hit dice are an abstract representation of your character's increasing capacity to survive as they grow.

For evey level a character has, they also have a hitdie. So a level 3 Fighter has 3 hitdice. A multiclassed level 3 Fighter/level 2 Rogue has 5 hitdice.

Hitdice work on a die type. This is based on class. Fighters have d10s for hitdice. So that level 3 Fighter has 3d10 hitdice. The multiclassed 3Fighter/2Rogue has 3d10/2d8 (Rogues have d8s for hitdice).

As you gain levels your character becomes harder to kill. This concept is is where HP comes from. HP is an abstraction of the physical capability a character has to withstand harm. Hitdice contribute to this concept as you level up. When our level 3 Fighter gains a level and takes another level in Fighter he gains another d10 as a hitdie (bringing his total to 4d10). He rolls this shiny new die and adds his CON modifier. This number is then added to his maximum HP pool. As you can see, classes with bigger hitdice and more constitution gain more HP as they level. In multiclass cases where different types of hitdice are in play, the newest one is the one that is rolled to determine the boost to max HP. So if our 3Fighter/2Rogue takes another level in Rogue then he rolls a D8+CON to boost his max HP and becomes a 3Fighter/3Rogue.

When it comes to spending hitdice to recover HP during a short rest (or any other circumstance that says you may spend hitdice) you are only using those dice as a temporary-but-renewable resource. You will only ever lose hitdice if you lose levels because those two things are inherently linked. When you take a short rest you have the option to spend hitdice to heal. So our now-level-4-Fighter can spend up to 4d10 during a short rest to catch his breath, patch up scrapes and bruises, stretch his cramping muscles, and relax his weary mind. The 3Fighter/3Rogue has 3d10s and 3d8s that can be spent in any order to recover in a short rest. Once spent, the hitdie or hitdice become unusable until your character takes a long rest in which they can sleep, tend to more serious wounds, and recover their lost stamina. You can easily extrapolate this concept and say that a higer level character (and thus a character with more hitdice at their disposal) can more readily bounce back from the hardships of combat with just a short rest. They are in better shape, tougher, more experienced.

It helps to think of hitdice as belonging in a box. When you level up you roll your new hit dice and toss it in a box with the rest of your hitdice. Then when it comes time to spend hit dice you pull them out and roll them and set them aside until you recover them with a long rest and toss them back in the box. If you are level 1 you will have a maximum of 1 hitdie in the box. If you are level 7 you will have 7 hitdice, which can be pulled out and spent until the box is empty. Take a long rest and you can put your 7 dice back in the box to be used later.
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Re: Rules Review

Postby wineandcheese » Thu Aug 13, 2015 9:49 am

Critical Hits

When you score a critical hit, you get to roll extra dice for the attack’s damage against the target. Roll all of the attack’s damage dice twice and add them together. Then add any relevant modifiers as normal. To speed up play, you can roll all the damage dice at once.

For example, if you score a critical hit with a dagger, roll 2d4 for the damage, rather than 1d4, and then add your relevant ability modifier. If the attack involves other damage dice, such as from the rogue’s Sneak Attack feature, you roll those dice twice as well.
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Re: Rules Review

Postby wineandcheese » Thu Nov 26, 2015 12:04 pm

Dying Explained:

When a character takes damage that results in them
being at or below 0 hit points, they fall unconscious.

If they take their maximum hit points negative they die instantly,
(example: 8 HP and they get hit for 16).
If not, then they are at 0 hit points. You cannot have negative hp
(example: 8 HP hit for 10 puts you at 0hp).

When you start a turn at zero you must roll a Death Saving Throw.
It is a D20 with no modifier.

On a 10 or higher: you gain 1 success.
Less than 10: you gain 1 failure.
On a 1: you gain 2 failures.
On a 20: you regain 1 hit point and wake up!

If you get 3 Successes you become stable
and remain at 0 hit points, but do not die.
If you get 3 Failures you bleed out and die.

If an ally makes a Medicine (Wisdom) check and gets a
10 or higher (DC10) you are stabilized at 0 hit points.
You then stop rolling saves and have to wait to heal.

Image

Instant Death

Massive damage can kill you instantly.
When damage reduces you to 0 hit points and there is
damage remaining, you die if the remaining damage
equals or exceeds your hit point maximum.
Last edited by wineandcheese on Wed May 25, 2016 9:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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ACTIONS!

Postby wineandcheese » Thu Dec 24, 2015 10:56 am


Basic combat actions you may take on your turn include:


Attack - melee or ranged
Cast a spell - whatever you have prepared and slots available
Dash - use your action to move up to your current movement speed. so if you have 30ft movement, you can move up to 60 feet on your turn.
Disengage - your movement during your turn will not provoke an attack of opportunity
Dodge - attacks made against you have disadvantage
Grapple - using acrobatics or athletic check you can get to wrastlin'
Escape Grapple - athletics or acrobatics check to escape from a grapple
Help - you can give someone advantage on their turn
Hide - make a stealth check to become hidden
Improvise - Create an action of your own barring DM discretion: break down a door, intimidate foe, swing from a rope etc.
Ready - a form of overwatch. you can delay your action to take place during someone else's turn.
Search - using a perception or investigation check
Shove - As grapple, but results in knocking your target prone or push it 5 feet away
Stabilize - Using a healers kit or medicine to cause a dying creature to become stable.

_____________________________________

Actions taken during an Encounter

Each round, during your turn, you can move and take one action.

• You don’t have to move, but if you choose to, you can move a distance up to your speed. You can move before or after you take an action, or you can move first, take an action, and then move again, as long as the total distance moved doesn’t exceed your speed.
• You don’t have to take an action during your turn, but if you choose to, you can attempt to do anything that could be accomplished in 6 seconds or less. The most common action taken in combat is the attack action. See below for a list of actions that can be performed in combat.
• If your action permits multiple attacks, you can move between attacks so long as you haven’t used all of your move distance based on your speed.
• Your move can include jumping onto or off of things, jumping over things, climbing walls or ropes, swinging on ropes or chandeliers, or moving in any way that your character is capable of such as swimming or flying for example.

You can interact with one object as part of either your move or your action.

You can manipulate the object in an uncomplicated way. Some examples include:
• Draw or sheath a weapon
• Draw Two One-Handed Weapons [You can normally draw only 1 weapon for free on your turn. Dual Wielder lets you draw 2.]
• Transfer an item from one hand to the other
• Load a crossbow
• Retrieve or put away a stored item*
• Pick up an item
• Move an object
• Open a chest
• Open a door
* You may only retrieve an item if it was stowed for easy access.
If you must dig through your backpack to find something inside,
it may require use of an action to retrieve it.
Doing more than one of these things requires the use of an action.

As part of your move or your action, you can do things that take little or no time and don’t interfere with your movement.

These activities take very little time, though there may be limits to the number you can perform in a turn. Examples include:
• Drawing ammunition for use with a ranged weapon (such as arrows, bolts, sling bullets, or shuriken).
• Dropping an item to your feet or within 5 feet of your current location.
• Dropping to a prone position. (Standing up from prone, however, takes half of your movement for the turn.)
• Speaking (you can always speak, even when it isn’t your turn – within reason.)

You may be able to take an additional, bonus action.

• A special ability, spell, or other feature of the game may allow you to do something as a bonus action. You are only allowed one bonus action in a round.
• Example: If you have a short sword in one hand and dagger in the other, after using your action to attack with the sword, you can use a bonus action to attack with the dagger (refer to the rules on two-weapon fighting.)

You are allowed one reaction each round.

A reaction is an action that is triggered by an external event.

• A special ability, spell, or other feature of the game may allow you to react to a specific triggering event.
• If an opponent attempts to move past you or attacks you and then attempts to move away, you get a free swing at him. This is called an opportunity attack, and it is the most common reaction.
• Another example would be a wizard’s feather fall spell that is triggered when the wizard is pushed over a cliff, or steps into a pit trap.
• Your reaction does not have to occur during your turn, but can occur at any time during the round. If it occurs during another’s turn, his turn is suspended until your reaction is resolved.

Surprise

If surprised, you lose your turn for the first round of combat. This includes loosing use of any reaction for one round, measured from the beginning of combat until the start of your turn on round two.

---

Actions in Combat

During your turn in a combat round, you can perform any one of the following actions:

Attack

You can make one melee or ranged attack. Some features may allow you to make more than one attack with this action.

Cast a Spell

You can cast any spell that you are capable of casting that has a listed casting time of one action.

Note regarding components: Retrieving the required material (M) component from a pocket or pouch is included in the “Cast a Spell” action. If the spell also has a somatic (S) component, you can perform the required hand gestures while holding the material component in that same hand. Therefore, if you are holding two weapons, or a weapon and a shield, at the beginning of your turn, you can sheath one weapon (refer to “interact with one object” above) and then draw the material component and cast the spell all in the same round. [A material component is not consumed with the casting of the spell, unless the spell description specifically says that it is.]

Dash

Rather than performing any other action, you spend the entire round moving. This allows you to move twice as far this round. It is effectively a double move action.

Disengage

If you start the round within 5 feet of an opponent that can see you, you can use this action to move away from him without provoking an opportunity attack.

If you use the disengage action no creatures can attack you with an Attack Of Oppourtunity during this round.

Dodge

This is a total defense action. You spend the round trying to avoid being hit. Until the start of your next turn, any attack roll made against you has disadvantage if you can see the attacker, and you make Dexterity saving throws with advantage.

Help

You can use your action to help an ally attack an opponent within 5 feet of you. You don’t make an attack yourself, but when your friend attacks, his first attack roll is made with advantage.
Or you can help him with any other task. If you are in position to do so, and your assistance could reasonably be seen to be of help, he will gain advantage on his ability check to accomplish the task.

Hide

The act of hiding requires an action to attempt. You must make a Dexterity (Stealth) check to see if you successfully hide from your opponents.
Additional information regarding the hide action here: Stealth and Hiding

Ready

Rather than taking an action during your turn, you wait for some specific event and then take your action as a reaction. You can still move up to the distance indicated by your move rate, but you can take no other action this round. You must specify two things:

1) What the triggering event will be.
This can be anything you think might happen that you can observe. If the event occurs before the start of your turn on the next round you can perform your readied action at that time. Some examples could be: If the sniper sticks his head up, If more Orcs come around the corner, If the rope brakes, If the water level rises, If the evil magic user starts to cast a spell, If the guard spots the thief, If the prisoner attempts to escape.

2) What action you will take.
This can be any of the combat actions.
Note that this action will be a reaction and you can only have one reaction per round. This means that if you take another reaction, you lose your readied action. Conversely, if you use your readied action you can have no other reactions this round.
• If the triggering event occurs, you can choose to not take your readied action.
• If you choose Dash as a readied action, you can move up to your move rate.
• If you choose Cast a Spell as a readied action, you cast the spell during your turn but hold off on releasing the energy of the spell until the triggering event occurs. You must concentrate to hold the spell’s energy. Anything that breaks your concentration before the final release of the spell’s energy results in the loss of the spell. If the triggering event doesn’t occur this round, you can continue to hold the spell with continued concentration into the following round, or you can cast it as an action on your next turn, or you can lose it.

Search

You can use your action to attempt to find something. The DM might require you to make a Wisdom (Perception) check or an Intelligence (Investigation) check.

Use an Object

An object may require an action for you to use it, or you may need to use this action to interact with more than one object in a round.

Improvised Action

There are many more things that a combatant could do during a round than can be accounted for in the above actions. When you want to attempt something that is not covered by any of the above actions, you can use an improvised action.

Examples of an improvised action:

“I want to pull the rug out from under that guy.”
“I want to jump on the monster and attack him with my sword while I ride on to his back.”
“I want to talk them into surrendering.”
“I want to break that flask the bad guy is holding.” (attack an object)
“I want to slide down the stairs on my shield while I fire arrows at the enemy.”
“I want to intimidate then into running away.”
“I want to grab that piece of folded parchment that is sticking out of his vest pocket.”
“I want to slide under the table and stab that guy in his ankle with my dagger.”
“I want to sheath my sword and walk up to that guy and tweak his nose.”
“I want to hit that rope with my arrow in such a way as to cut the rope and let the body that is hanging from it fall to the ground.”
“I want to disarm my opponent.” (This could be a called shot to the hand, shattering an opponent’s weapon, severing a spear shaft, entangling a sword arm, or using the flat of a blade to smack a weapon from an enemy’s hand.)
“I want to push him into the pit.” (Use the rules for “Shoving a Creature” – this could include shield bashes, tackles, bull rushes, overruns, tables hurled into enemies, doors smashed into opponents on the other side, and so on. Generally speaking, this could be any attempt to use brute strength to move an opponent. Any attempt to shove creatures off a nearby cliff, through a railing, out a chapel’s stained-glass window, and so on will allow the creature a dexterity save.)
“I want to trip that guy.” (This could be any attempt to knock an enemy off its feet. Whether it’s hooking an enemy’s leg, stabbing a kneecap, knocking an opponent off-balance, hurling an enemy away, sweeping an enemy’s legs, or some other maneuver, this improvised action would allow the warrior to knock an enemy prone.)

The following rules apply to improvised actions:
1. You must explain the improvised action to the DM. The DM may rule that what you want to do will require more than one round, or that it is simply impossible (you can’t fire an arrow into the sky and hit the moon). He may ask you to be more specific regarding the action you want to take and how the action will achieve the results you want.
2. The improvised action can also include all or part of your move. Successfully jumping on – or diving into a creature will give you advantage on the attack roll. A failed attempt results in your move stopping at the point there the attack takes place and may grant your opponent an advantage on his next attack against you.
3. To perform the improvised action the DM will normally have you make an ability check. The DM will assign an appropriate difficulty class and will explain possible consequences if the attempted action fails. For example, if you attempt to jump off of the balcony onto the monster in the center of the room and miss you may end up prone.

Most improvised actions can be resolved as simple contests.
Player: “I want to try to [describes some form of physical contest other than an attack roll].”
DM: “Okay, make a Strength (Athletics) check.”
DM compares result to opponent’s Strength (Athletics) or Dexterity (Acrobatics) check, perhaps giving someone advantage or disadvantage.
Last edited by wineandcheese on Mon May 02, 2016 9:52 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Rules Review - Magic Items

Postby wineandcheese » Thu Dec 24, 2015 11:05 am

Magic Items

A magic item's description explains how the item works. Handling a magic item is enough to give a character a sense that something is extraordinary about the item. Casting the 'identify' spell on the item then reveals its properties. Alternatively, a character can concentrate on the item during a short rest, while being in physical contact with the item. At the end of the rest, the character learns the item's properties. Potions are an exception; a little taste is enough to tell the taster what the potion does.

Attunement

Certain magic items require a user to attune to them before their magical properties can be used. Attuning
to a magic item requires that you spend a short rest concentrating on it (this can't be the same short rest
used to learn an item's properties). Depending on the nature of the item, this concentration can take the form of prayers, weapon practice, or meditation. In any case, the concentration period must be uninterrupted. Once you are attuned to an item, you can use its magical properties.

An item can be attuned to only one creature at a time. A creature can be attuned to no more than three magic items at any given time, and you can attune yourself to only one item during a short rest.

Your attunement to an item ends when the item has been more than 100 feet away from you for 24 hours and when you die. You can also voluntarily end your attunement to an item with another short rest.
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Re: Rules Review

Postby wineandcheese » Tue Jan 05, 2016 12:19 am

Resting

Heroic though they might be, adventurers can’t spend every hour of the day in the thick of exploration, social interaction, and combat. They need rest—time to
sleep and eat, tend their wounds, refresh their minds andspiritsforspellcasting,andbracethemselvesfor further adventure.
Adventurers can take short rests in the midst of an adventuring day and a long rest to end the day.

Short Rest

A short rest is a period of downtime, at least 1 hour long, during which a character does nothing more strenuous than eating, drinking, reading, and tending to wounds.
A character can spend one or more Hit Dice at the end of a short rest, up to the character’s maximum number of Hit Dice, which is equal to the character's level. For each Hit Die spent in this way, the player rolls the die and adds the character’s Constitution modifier to it. The character regains hit points equal to the total. The player can decide to spend an additional Hit Die after each roll. A character regains some spent Hit Dice upon finishing a long rest, as explained below.

Long Rest

A long rest is a period of extended downtime, at least 8 hours long, during which a character sleeps or performs light activity: reading, talking, eating, or standing watch for no more than 2 hours. If the rest is interrupted by a period of strenuous activity—at least 1 hour of walking, fighting, casting spells, or similar adventuring activity— the characters must begin the rest again to gain any benefit from it.
At the end of a long rest, a character regains all lost hit points. The character also regains spent Hit Dice, up to a number of dice equal to half of the character’s total number of them. For example, if a character has eight Hit Dice, he or she can regain four spent Hit Dice upon finishing a long rest.
A character can’t benefit from more than one long rest in a 24-hour period, and a character must have at least
1 hit point at the start of the rest to gain its benefits.

When having a long rest, you regain all your hit points and half your spent Hit Dice
Last edited by wineandcheese on Sun May 22, 2016 5:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Rules Review

Postby wineandcheese » Thu Apr 28, 2016 5:12 pm

For thrown fire bombs use the following rules:

Oil

1sp per flask (common)
range: 20 feet.
As an action you can splash oil on a creature within 5 feet,
or you can throw the flask up to 20 feet using the following rules:
d20 + DEXTERITY bonus vs Target AC to hit. No proficiency bonus added.
On a hit, the target is covered in oil.
If the target takes any fire damage before the oil dries (one minute),
the target takes an additional 5 damage from the burning oil.
You can also pour a flask of oil onto the ground to cover a 5 foot sq area,
provided the ground is level. If lit, the oil burns for two rounds and deals
5 fire damage to any creature that enters or ends their turn in that square.
A creature can only take this damage once per turn.
page 152 PHB.


_______


Alchemist's Fire.

50gp from an Alchemy shop. (uncommon)
range: 20 feet.
d20 + DEXTERITY bonus vs Target AC to hit. No proficiency bonus added.
On a hit, the target takes 1d4 fire damage at the start of each of its turns. A creature can end this damage by using its action to make a DC 10 Dexterity check to extinguish the flames.

Any creature within 5 feet of the target needs to make a 12 dex save,
-On an unsuccessful save the creature receives 1 point of flame damage.
-On a successful save target receives no additional damage.

_______

Master Alchemist's Fire.

200gp from an Alchemy shop. (rare)
range: 20 feet.
d20 + DEXTERITY bonus vs Target AC to hit. No proficiency bonus added.
On a hit, the target takes 1d6 fire damage at the start of each of its turns. A creature can end this damage by using its action to make a DC 10 Dexterity check to extinguish the flames.

Any creature within 5 feet of the target needs to make a 12 dex save,
-On an unsuccessful save the creature receives 1d4 dmg for up to 3 rounds at the start of their turn or spend 1 action to extinguish, stopping further damage.
-On a successful save target only get half damage from 1d4.

Volatility.
- Any player carrying these fire bombs is at risk of having them ignite on their person.
If any of the flasks being carried catch fire, the player takes 1d6 damage per flask and automatically fails the dex save, taking an additional 1d4 for 3 rounds per flask and spend 1 round per flask to extinguish the flames, (stopping the fire damage if done).

- Any creature who sustains Bludgeoning damage while carrying Master Alchemist Fire risks having the container break while on their person. If the flasks break open they will ignite. Follow rules above as if the weapon automatically hits.
Last edited by wineandcheese on Fri Aug 19, 2016 10:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Rules Review

Postby wineandcheese » Wed May 25, 2016 9:20 am

Glass Dust

A handful of glass dust thrown into an enemies eyes.

A ranged attack made at melee range, disadvantage to hit.

Once hit, target makes a Dex Save.
On a failed save the target takes
1d4 dmg and is blinded until they take a short or long rest

--

critical hit delivers an extra 1d4 dmg.

critical fumble gets dust in your own eyes,
automatically failing the dex save,
taking 1d4 dmg and blinded until a short or long rest
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Re: Rules Review

Postby wineandcheese » Fri Jun 10, 2016 11:19 am

Cover

Half cover gives +2 to AC and Dex saves.
Three-quarters cover gives +5 to AC and Dex saves.
Total cover means you cannot be directly targeted. 'a target has total cover if it is completely concealed by an obstacle'
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